My Blog

Posts for: May, 2019

By JC DUNCAN DDS, PA
May 20, 2019
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Crowns and Bridges  

Find out how a simple crown or bridge could improve your smile.

Whether you have cracked a tooth on food that was just a little too hard or you are dealing with a sports-related accident, there are many dental-crownsreasons why you might need to come into our Huntersville, NC, office for some restorative dentistry treatment. Supplying simple solutions such as dental crowns and bridges, Dr. JC Duncan can help you restore your damaged smile!

 

What is a dental crown?

Okay, so we know that most people know what a crown is by now—however, that doesn’t necessarily mean that everyone explicitly understands how they work. So, let us clear up any misconceptions or confusion around dental crowns!

A crown is a hollow, tooth-shaped cap that is custom-made to cover the entire visible portion of a tooth to the gum line. Following installation, a crown naturally becomes the new and stronger outer layer for a tooth, making the treatment ideal for protecting weak or damaged teeth.

Even though crowns can be made from a few different materials, our Huntersville, NC, general dentist understands how important it is to get a restoration that looks like the real thing. Accordingly, we offer crowns that are made from tooth-colored materials like porcelain or ceramic.

 

What is a dental bridge?

At this point, you may be wondering why crowns and bridges are mentioned together. Well, that’s because crowns are actually an integral part of a dental bridge! A bridge is designed to fill the gap or gaps in your smile with realistic looking replacement teeth. In order to hold this false tooth in place, dental crowns are placed on either side it, allowing the restoration to be anchored to its neighboring natural counterparts.

Once the crowns have been cemented into place by your dentist, the false-tooth-containing-bridge can be cemented to the crowns, thus filling in the tooth gap. Crowns are great for either replacing a single missing tooth or two teeth in a row.

 

Give us a call!

Interested in crowns and bridges? If so, contact our Huntersville, NC, office today to schedule a consultation with one of expert dentist. Restoring your smile is easy—just dial (704) 948-1300 and leave it to Dr. Duncan!


ConsideranEffectiveandAffordableRPDforTeethReplacement

If you have a few missing teeth but can't afford dental implants or fixed bridgework, consider a removal partial denture (RPD). Although implants may be the superior choice aesthetically and functionally, an RPD can still effectively give you back your teeth.

RPDs are designed to replace one or more missing teeth but not a full arch like a full denture. Considered a permanent restoration, RPDs are also more durable than transitional "flippers," denture appliances that are flexible and light enough to be flipped out of the mouth with a flick of the tongue.

The key to both their affordability and durability is vitallium, a strong but lightweight metal alloy most often used in their frame construction. To it we attach artificial teeth usually made of porcelain or glass-filled resins that occupy the precise location of the missing teeth on the gum ridge. The artificial teeth and frame are surrounded by gum-colored plastic for a more natural look.

Each RPD is custom-made depending on the number and location of the missing teeth. Its construction will focus on minimizing any rocking movement of the RPD during chewing or biting. Too much of this movement could damage the adjacent teeth it's attaching to and cause the appliance to be uncomfortable to wear. We can stabilize the frame by precisely fitting it between teeth to buttress it. We also insert small rests or clasps made of vitallium at strategic points to grip teeth and minimize movement.

RPDs do have some downsides: their unique attachment with teeth encourages the accumulation of dental plaque, the thin bacterial film that's the leading cause of tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. These diseases can affect your remaining teeth's health and stability, which could in turn disrupt the fit of the RPD. Also, too much movement of the appliance can make the teeth to which it's attached become more mobile. It's important, then, if you wear a RPD to remove it daily for cleaning (and to thoroughly brush and floss your natural teeth), and to remove it at night to give the attaching teeth a rest.

A RPD can give you back the teeth you've lost for many years to come—if you take care of it. Maintaining both your RPD and the rest of your teeth and gums will help extend the life and use of this effective and affordable replacement restoration.

If you would like more information on teeth replacement options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Partial Dentures: Still a Viable Tooth-Replacement Alternative.”


ThatPainfulIrritatingFeelingCouldbeBurningMouthSyndrome

For some time now you've noticed a painful, burning sensation in your mouth for no apparent reason. It doesn't matter what you eat or drink — or whether you eat or drink — the dry, tingling sensation seems to stay with you.

You may have Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS). You feel as if your mouth is scalded or burning generally or in a certain area like the lips, tongue or inside of the cheeks. Regardless, the discomfort (which seems to grow as the day wears on) can contribute to irritability, anxiety or depression.

It's not always easy to lock in on the specific cause. BMS has been linked, among other things, to diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, or cancer therapy. It's common among women around the age of menopause, so there's some speculation it could be affected by hormonal changes. It could also be connected with dry mouth (brought on by age or medications), an allergic reaction to toothpaste ingredients, acid reflux or autoimmune disorders.

While there's no single proven treatment for BMS, there are some things you can do to lessen its effects. First, stop habits that cause dry mouth like smoking, drinking alcohol or coffee and eating hot and spicy foods. Second, keep your mouth moist by frequently drinking water or using products that stimulate saliva flow.

You might also try toothpastes without sodium lauryl sulfate (a detergent that can cause skin peeling in some people), whiteners or strong flavorings like cinnamon. If you have chronic dry mouth, speak with your physician about any medications you're taking that might be causing it and seek alternatives. And because stress seems to magnify your symptoms, try to reduce it in your life through relaxation techniques, exercise or group support.

In some cases, BMS may resolve itself over time. In the mean time, making these lifestyle changes could help ease your discomfort.

If you would like more information on burning mouth syndrome, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Painful Puzzle.”